Premiere: Finn’s Motel Releases New Music Video Made by Blip Blap

September 18, 2014 Leave a comment
Video still from Finn's Motel's "Recurring Dream with Halo's Glow"

Video still from Finn’s Motel’s “Recurring Dream with Halo’s Glow”

Premiere: Finn’s Motel Releases New Music Video Made by Blip Blap
By Jaime Lees
Thu., Sep. 18 2014

RFT Music is proud to premiere the new music video for Finn’s Motel‘s “Recurring Dream with Halo’s Glow,” a bright, warm track off of the bands upcoming album Into the Realm of Jupiter Rex.

With nearly every scene soaked in steep, slanting sun, the video perfectly captures the fading end of summer. The use of light and the clarity of the scenes are representative of the kind of magnetic quality that we’ve come to expect from local production company Blip Blap Video.

This is a family and community affair from top to bottom– everything here is locally sourced:

  • Finn’s Motel is staffed by St. Louis music scene lifers: [in order of appearance] Joe Thebeau (vocals, guitar), Patrick Hawley (drums), Chris Grabau (vocals, guitar), Steve Scariano (bass guitar), Toby Weiss (vocals) and Matt Meyer (lead guitar).
  • Location scenes were shot all around the metro area, including Affton High School and Cahokia Mounds– places that effortlessly echo the lyrics of the song. (“With the light around your face” / “a thousand years of history”)
  • Finn’s Motel songwriter Joe Thebeau’s son, Alex Thebeau, is the featured actor– a little fact that lends an extra bit of sweetness to the story presented in the video.
  • The performance scenes were filmed at the Thebeau family home and proudly feature four-legged cutie “Murphy the Incidental Dog.” The house also has many works by local artists on display. Thebeau offers: “While watching the video, play the game everyone is soon to be playing: trying to identify the St. Louis artists’ work we are fortunate to hang on our walls.”

Check out the new video and song details below:

“Recurring Dream with Halo’s Glow” (Thebeau)
Ⓒ Ⓟ Victory Over Gravity Music 2014
Recorded at Incidental Dog Studio, Affton, Missouri
Mixed by Matt Meyer at IBC Shadows Music, Desoto, Missouri
Video by Blip Blap! Video
Featuring Alex Thebeau (and Murphy the Incidental Dog)
Directed by Brian McClelland
Production assistance by Mary Whiteside

- link: Riverfront Times

Pü Fest Kickoff Party – Critic’s Pick

September 5, 2014 Leave a comment

PuFest
Pü Fest Kickoff Party
w/ Tone Rodent, Jack Grelle, Pizza Boys, Black Panties
by Jaime Lees

9:00 p.m. September 5
Melt
2712 Cherokee Street St. Louis, MO
314-771-6358
Price: free

LouFest has been gaining a reputation as a solid destination festival, but this year it has also accidentally inspired a rival underground music concert with a tounge-in-cheek name: Pü Fest. The organizers aren’t billing it as an anti-LouFest party, but as a DIY alternative to the mega-mainstream acts that LouFest offers. Pü Fest also will run throughout the weekend, hosting tons of local talent and crowd-favorite touring bands. The kickoff party is this Friday at Melt, and features Tone Rodent, Jack Grelle, Pizza Boys and Black Panties. The event is free and is your last chance to buy a discounted weekend pass before the festival starts.

link: Riverfront Times
link: Pü Fest

The Breeders – Critic’s Pick

September 4, 2014 Leave a comment

BreedersPool
The Breeders
by Jaime Lees

8:00 p.m. September 2
Off Broadway
3509 Lemp Ave. St. Louis, MO
Price: $22-$25
w/ The Funs

The ’90s revival is upon us. Chunky-heeled boots and daisy-print dresses are back in fashion, but the most welcome — and maybe unexpected — thing to cycle back into favor is the Breeders. Known for its 1993 radio hit “Cannonball,” the Dayton, Ohio band has recently been awash in productivity and acclaim. Last year it released a twentieth anniversary version of beloved album Last Splash and the influential group has been getting props all over world, with invitations to play at massive international music festivals. The band is passing on the love, too: Midwest/St. Louis art-punker act the Funs is scheduled to open for the Breeders on a five-day stretch of its current tour.

link: Riverfront Times

The Funs Kick Off Tour with the Breeders Tonight at Off Broadway

September 4, 2014 Leave a comment
The Funs, photo by John Birkner

The Funs, photo by John Birkner

The Funs Kick Off Tour with the Breeders Tonight at Off Broadway
By Jaime Lees
Tue., Sep. 2 2014

Local artsy/DIY duo the Funs has pulled off the unthinkable: a slot opening for its very favorite band, the Breeders. The Funs will play the first five dates of the tour starting tonight at Off Broadway and ending September 8 in Garden City, Idaho.

Alt-rock band the Breeders has a long history with St. Louis — nearly always scheduling a tour date in the area to accommodate its huge fan base here. This allegiance was most pronounced when the band chose the Lou as a place to film a music video, borrowing our Arch Rival Roller Girls to use as its stars.

The two members of the Funs, Philip Jerome Lesicko and Jessee Rose Crane, have made a name for themselves as an uncompromising, inventive team. Last year, Riverfront Times writer Mabel Suen described the appeal of the Funs like this: “The resulting racket… blasts its way out through a tower of amps, a fuzzy, buzzy wall disjointed by sharp drumming. The two rotate roles between drums and guitar, both crooning through a reverb-drenched haze, floating flawed and fraught with inescapable feelings through outer space.”

We contacted the members of the Funs and had a mutual Breeders gushy-love-session where they praised their new tour mates, expressed their excitement and explained their plans for the future.

Kelley Deal supports St. Louis (and women's rights) in 2012, photo by Jaime Lees

Kelley Deal of the Breeders supports St. Louis (and women’s rights) in 2012, photo by Jaime Lees

Jaime Lees: Tell me how you got the opening slot for the Breeders on this Midwest section of the tour.

Crane: Frank Sharp (Mr. Big) from Sharp Records contacted us from his limo and asked us to play.

Lesicko: I sent an email to an address that I thought might reach Kim [Deal, Breeders vocalist]. The Breeders are our favorite band in so many ways. I sent the email because we care about the Breeders, not because we want to open for a big band. They are one of the few bands that keep it real. And I respect them so much for that. When I received a response I felt… I don’t think there is a word for it. I cannot explain how much it means to us to be able to tour with the Breeders.

Crane: No, really, Philip sent her a video; can you believe that? I can’t. I never would have because I can’t believe that this could happen. Kim reaches out to a lot of smaller bands; it’s one of the billion reasons she’s amazing. We don’t have a booking agent or manager or a big label backing us. We done this all ourselves. We told her we could send more music if she wanted and she said no the live stuff is what matters and it’s really good.

Now Philip can get away with anything for the rest of our lives because if we ever get in a fight, he can just say, “Remember when we went on tour with the Breeders?” and I’ll shut up. It’s un-fucking-real. Most people can’t understand what a big deal this is to me. Unless you could go back in time and see me as kid falling in love with them and talking about them ad nauseum. I’m obsessed. Philip told me and I cried. We were recording at Public House Sound Recordings in Chicago when we got the call and I started to cry. I was just screaming and crying and it was raining and I went out in the rain in my sock feet and was screaming. I thought I was having a heart attack. I had a total meltdown in front of this recording guy, Dave, who I barely knew and he started tearing up I think. He’s really the sweetest guy so it was cool. Really there are no words.

What are some of your favorite Breeders songs and why?

Crane: Well, for whatever reason, “Little Fury,” the first song on Title TK always got me. The breakdown when she sings “Hold what you’ve got.” I love that part, and it just starts so fucking raw. It’s amazing. We actually covered that song once at a Halloween show in Chicago; we did a Breeders set. So that’s on the internet somewhere. I’m dressed like a nun. “Off You” is one of the greatest songs ever written, hands down. The lyrics “I am the autumn in the scarlet / I am the makeup on your eyes.” What? Too good. “I’ve never seen a starlet / Or a riot or the violence of you.” Too fucking good. They just put “Off You” in that new movie Her and I heard it and was, like, woah that’s weird. I would listen that song over and over and over.

Can I just say “Cannonball” is not even close to one of my favorites? And I’m not saying that to go against the grain, but it does annoy me that people are like “Oh, the Breeders? They have that song ‘Cannonball’ right?” And I’m like, “Yeah, and dozens of other songs that are amazing.” All their albums are good. You should listen to them all. Oh yeah, back to the question: I love the song “Doh!” Because it’s weird and oddly beautiful. She is seriously underrated as a songwriter and vocalist. Like, Kim is Bob Dylan and Billie Holiday. Name your biggest names. I don’t care who they are, she is that.

Who do you consider your influences?

Lesicko: Honest, hardworking people in life, art and everything else.

Crane: Well, I think you know, maybe. The Breeders. They are really the only one I can count. Kim has always just been herself and stayed true to herself and who she is and what she does. She really cares about the music and recordings and I feel the same way. She has been a great inspiration to just keep doing what we do.

How do you describe your sound?

Lesicko: It is very intense, in a way that hopefully engages the audience in a positive way. We make music that is natural to us. We care about it. We don’t try to do one thing or the other. Its an extension of who we are and what we are. It’s not for everyone. But I think when people connect they really connect. If you are interested, we can easily be found.

Crane: It’s hard, you know. People have told me more than once that we play emotion. That our songs sound like feelings more than musicians. I can agree with that. I don’t consider myself a musician, for some reason. I would say I’m an artist though. It’s innate, for sure, and all that “whatever” comes out. I don’t think about it or analyze it. Our music is Philip and I’s brains transformed into sound waves. That is what we sound like: fucking crazy brain waves.

Aside from playing live, what are some of your other projects?

Lesicko: We run a label called Manic Static. I put everything into that. We are rehabbing our home called Rose Raft in rural Illinois. It will become a residency for working artists and musicians in the not-too-distant future.

Crane: I make hats out of tin foil and glue and costume jewelry. You want one? I spend a lot of time with tin foil. I sculpt flowers out of plastic bags. I draw cats. I sew little dolls out of socks I call Peekers and sell them at shows, because I’m broke and am bad at money. And yes, I am turning my home into an artist residency. Rose Raft.

What are your plans for the future, band-wise?

Lesicko: The band will never end. We will always write songs together and record them. And I know that people out there dig them, and that is so amazing to me. We will be recording a new record this winter. We hope to have it out in the spring. Followed by non-stop touring.

Crane: I plan to keep making music until my life functions cease. So, lets say an album a year ’til that happens. I’ve been doing that a while now, and you are asking me these questions. We are going on tour with Breeders. As far as I am concerned, I don’t need to do anything else with my life.

link: Riverfront Times

Bob Reuter To Be Remembered By St. Louis Community in Show At Ready Room Saturday

August 15, 2014 Leave a comment

Bob Reuter giving a partial thumbs-up outside Off Broadway in 2011. (He was unsure how to feel about being forced to wear my STL bling necklace.) / photo by Jaime Lees

Bob Reuter giving a partial thumbs-up outside Off Broadway in 2011. (He was unsure how to feel about being forced to wear my STL bling necklace.) / photo by Jaime Lees

I keep wondering what Bob Reuter would have to say about the recent violence and civil unrest in St. Louis. He would have a lot to say, no doubt. He always had a lot to say.

That was probably my favorite thing about him: how he could go on and on about any old thing. The man could spin a yarn. Most of his stories seemed to be exaggerated for effect, but that was part of his charm. In any case, Reuter seemed incapable of keeping his mouth shut. In a world where many commentaries are muted or diluted for a potentially disapproving audience, Reuter would’ve been talking and commenting all over the Internet and losing Facebook friends left and right. He would’ve been blabbing, and it would’ve been entertaining, at least, and possibly infuriating. Or it might have been insightful and wise. He was unpredictable, that Bob.

Reuter died on August 3 of last year in a tragic elevator accident. His passing punched a big fat hole into the heart of the St. Louis music scene, not just because he was gone but also because his death felt avoidable. Reuter was a leader (and much to his chagrin, an elder) of all of the beautiful musical and artistic weirdness that flourishes in south city. He was a musician, a DJ, a photographer and a writer. By extension, he was an accidental St. Louis historian and photojournalist, quietly and slowly documenting decades of St. Louis bands and characters.

On August 3 of this year — exactly one year and one hour after Reuter passed — I found myself sitting beside his ashes. I went to the home of Chris Baricevic to interview him about Reuter’s legacy and his grand plans for the future.

Reuter's ashes (in the bomb) lovingly displayed on Baricevic's mantle. / photo by Jaime Lees

Reuter’s ashes (in the bomb) lovingly displayed on Baricevic’s mantle. / photo by Jaime Lees

Baricevic was written into Reuter’s will as the executor of his estate. In a strange generational role reversal, Baricevic and Reuter mutually mentored each other. Reuter showed Baricevic the ways of the old-school St. Louis musicians, and Baricevic worked to help Reuter acclimate to new ways of doing things. Reuter once told me that he owed Baricevic for a “life turn-around.”

It’s an easy scenario to imagine. In all ways, Baricevic is a man who gets things done. As the founder of Big Muddy Records, he is an essential piece in the local music scene puzzle, and his specialty seems to be digging up and promoting worthy local talent. He will use whatever limited resources he has to somehow manage not only to complete his goals, but to thrive. He’s calm, smart, hard-working and the kind of guy who seems to just naturally press coal into diamonds.

After doing his best to wrangle Reuter when he was alive, Baricevic now has the unenviable (and everlasting) job of managing Reuter’s posthumous affairs. A month or so after Reuter’s death, he hosted a memorial tribute concert at the Casa Loma ballroom. It was, by all accounts, a successful endeavor both spiritually and financially. Aside from being one of the most impressive, talent-packed and touching things that many in the local music community have ever seen, it funded the initial donation into a piggy bank that intends keeps Reuter’s work available to the public for generations to come.

A scene at the memorial concert. / photo by Jaime Lees

A scene at the memorial concert. / photo by Jaime Lees

Baricevic has many projects up his sleeve. First of all, Reuter’s band, Alley Ghost, is still touring and playing his music, and the men of Alley Ghost are scheduled to record even more Reuter-penned music soon. Recordings of his old band, the Dinosaurs, are currently being mastered by St. Louis expatriate Mario Viele (of Sex Robots fame) and will be eventually released to the hungry public. And Baricevic has big plans for his Cowboy Angel Foundation, an organization set up to ensure Reuter’s legacy and contribute to the local music community.

Tomorrow night at the Ready Room, Bob’s bandmate family will host a show in honor of his birthday. Alley Ghost is headlining, of course, and supporting acts include Johnny Walker (Soledad Brothers), James Leg (Black Diamond Heavies), the Defeated County and Jack Grelle. Joseph Sulier will be reading some of Reuter’s writings, Ashley Hohman is spinning Bob’s Scratchy Records after the show, and there will be merchandise for sale and a silent auction of items donated by local bands and organizations.

Read on for more about Reuter’s legacy, legalities surrounding his death and the massive potential for the St. Louis music community through the Cowboy Angel Foundation in the interview below.

———-

Jaime Lees: Tell me what’s been going on in the past year.

Chris Baricevic: Well, what’s been going on with Bob’s stuff in the last year is this: Most of it is hung up in bureaucracy. We’re still waiting for probate to stamp the will, you know, and so it’s all kind of hung up in the legal process and probate court and all of that.

I’ve been trying to find a spot — like, a public spot, to put the bulk of his ashes in. I’ve been talking to the woman in charge of the park that’s going in next to Mangia and — fingers crossed — they’ll let us put them in there. But that’s in the same kind of process. They told me they have to, like, write policies and stuff. So I don’t know if that’s a for sure thing or not, but that’s what I’d like to do: have him on South Grand somewhere where people can visit. I mean, he was a public figure. So we’ll see what happens with that. I don’t really have a backup plan.

As far as his music goes, Mario [Viele] took a bunch of reel-to-reels up to New York. He’s been mastering them over the course of the past four or five months, and he’s got enough that we’ll be putting out two full LPs of original Dinosaurs recordings from 1978 to 1979. There will be one album of home-studio recordings — they had a four-track machine, it seems — and one album from a live reel. They used to play three- or four-hour gigs at these different bars in town, and they recorded a few of the shows, and we have one full concert which they play pretty much all of their originals, and it sounds really good. So we’re going to put out a “live at the no-name disco” LP, as well.

As far as going through Bob’s past work, that’s as far as we’ve gotten is the Dinosaurs. And other than that, Alley Ghost is going to be recording a new record in a few weeks here at Native Sound. Mario is coming into town to get behind the board, I’m going to be producing it and Brice [Baricevic] is doing most of the vocals. Mat [Wilson] does a song or two. And Alley Ghost as Bass Amp [Maysam Attaran], Brice, Mat, Adam [Hesed] and Dan-O [Daniel Lawless] have been touring about once a month pretty much since the beginning of 2014. Next week they’re doing a five-day run down to New Orleans. So they’ll continue to be touring with the Bucket City booking agency, and we’ll be doing that record.

And as far as when that stuff will come out? I don’t know. Because I think I have to wait for the will to go through probate court first.

When do you expect that?

[Laughs] You can’t expect things from the legal process. You’re just kind of at their mercy.

You’ve had good, proper legal advice, right?

I’ve definitely had legal advice, but I don’t know what legal advice is good and proper! [Laughs]

So has someone argued that the will is invalid for some reason? Is that’s what is taking so long?

No, it just takes a long time to process. It took me about four months to get his death certificate. It was so ridiculous. Because you can’t even start the probate process until you get the death certificate, so I was just calling every few weeks and ask if it was done. They’d say, “No, it’s not done yet.” I would call the, you know, the coroner’s office. And then one day in December I called them and this lady was like, “I don’t know what you’re talking about. We’ve had this thing done since September.” So just more bureaucratic fun. [Rolls eyes] I don’t know what happened. I just got the feeling that it was some kind of filing-cabinet error. Who knows.

Before you can advance with the Cowboy Angel Foundation, all of this has to be done first, right?

OK, so here’s what’s up with the foundation: That all seems like a somewhat far-off vision. All of the money that we made in the month after Bob died with donations and income from the concert, pretty much all of that is going into records: into the Dinosaurs records, into the Alley Ghost record. All of the money made from those will go back into it. It will all have the Big Muddy boat label on it, but financially, all of Bob’s recordings are separate. The money we made was enough to start putting out records, basically.

But not enough to keep putting out records?

Well, we’ll keep putting them out if they sell. But to do anything on the scale of what I’d like Cowboy Angel to be is, like, a way bigger endeavor that would require a lot more start-up cash, so all we can afford to do is start putting out Bob’s stuff. And then eventually, hopefully, we’ll have enough money to start putting out all of his photography, his writing and stuff as well. And until we find a buried treasure somewhere…

I mean, you’re open to benefactors, right?

Oh yeah! Totally, totally. But until then we’ll just keep putting our energy towards that. The band wants to keep doing their thing so they’ll have all of Bob’s merchandise with them. It’s been going really well with them on the road.

Alley Ghost has really been touring every month?

Just about. At least a weekend or two. I know that they’ve done a lot of the cities that they went to with Bob. I think they’re still just doing the same kind of stuff: small shows and small venues and bars that a band starting out on the road would play.

I think it’s great that Bob can get new fans without even being there.

Yeah! They’ve been saying that it’s going really well.

So, with the terrible stuff concerning that elevator and all, you can’t legally do anything about that until…when?

Everybody tells me that I can’t do anything legally about it at all. At all.

At all?

At all.

Why?

Because Missouri says you have to be a blood relative to sue. It’s a rare thing. Missouri is, like, one of two states where the executor of the estate doesn’t have any stake to sue on stuff like that.

Well, that’s disappointing.

Yeah, if this were Illinois it would be an open and closed case. It would probably be so obvious that it would be settled out of court.

So, there’s no hope that there’s a giant check coming your way still from stuff like that?

Well, that’s not even the point, though. From what I understand, the person that’s responsible… [trails off] Honestly, it’s all just so crazy. It needs, like, a Nick Fury-type detective to come in and pull all of the shadows away. It’s all very blurry. The city tells me that the investigation is ongoing. All I know for sure is that I don’t have the power to sue. Everybody keeps telling me that I, personally, can’t.

Well, it would be nice to have the option even if that’s not the path that you decided to take. What’s the point of an executor if you can’t execute?

And also, it just seems like somebody is getting away with some very extreme criminal negligence here. Somebody or multiple people, you know. The city is ignoring it. The people whose names are on the building are ignoring it. So it’s all pretty frustrating.

Because you knew him so well, what do you think that Bob’s fans could to as the best tribute to him? What do you think that he would like for them to do?

Just to listen to his music, read his books and look at his pictures. That was pretty much what he cared about: his art. I think that Bob would just want people to get into his stuff, honestly. He’d want them to get into his stuff and to get into themselves in the same way; to be a creative spirit.

Chris Baricevic smiling at Bob Reuter's memorial show / photo by Jaime Lees

Chris Baricevic smiling at Bob Reuter’s memorial show / photo by Jaime Lees

So what are your ideas for the future?

I do have somewhat of a vision for what Cowboy Angel should be. I’ve really only tried to vocalize it once or twice before. But the idea would be — in a land of infinite possibility with no financial or resource restraints — there’s this building. And it’s a center for artistic and creative people in St. Louis. It would provide them with living resources. Like, for example, it would be a place where you go to get help finding a job, finding a place to live, finding medical help, psychiatric help, life coaching, counseling. Also, the center would also be a place where music lessons are taught and organized. For example, we would have musicians from the city going out to teach people with the focus being on underprivileged people who don’t have these resources normally.

It would be a place for people who don’t have the environment to craft not only their art, but also their life so that it is allowing them to continue making their art. Which is pretty much what I did with Bob — I was working with him to help him get his life to a place where he was working on his art and still getting by without any kind of frustration in that cycle.

So the center would focus on that idea and kind of web out into all the things that an artist or an aspiring artist would need to survive with their art. That includes work spaces, education, etc. It would be a community in which people can support themselves and each other in ways that are just kind of up to their imagination. And the idea is that it’s this thing that exists with Bob’s spirit and some of the money would be funneled into it, but the bulk of that money will stay towards the continuing production of his music. It’s such a grand notion that eventually it would have to have separate fundraising. But the basic idea is just that it’s a center for south-city freaks and weirdos and creative people to just kind of make their lives better and to contribute to and be a part of the community.

It’s nice because there’s already a lot of that in St. Louis but on smaller levels.

It’s something that happens naturally, for sure. The community aspect of this is just a forward-movement of all of that.

Like an extension of it?

Right, exactly. But the focus would be more on the things that all of these people struggle with, you know? Which is a lot of times just help getting by or help finding resources that they don’t know are available to them. And maybe situations will improve with health care changing, but honestly poor people are still going to need financial help.

Yeah, a new health-care system doesn’t change the gas bill.

Right. So the idea is just to have this place where people get together that is just helping the artist to get by and live better lives. But, like I said, it’s a grand vision for the moment, unless somebody wants to step in and throw down to make that more of a reality.

Or hand you a building?

Right! Or hand me a building! It’s just kind of a far-away vision. Right now my focus is on what Bob’s legacy is going to be, on Bob’s band still doing their thing and on the production and distribution of his art.

photo by Jaime Lees

photo by Jaime Lees

Event information for the Bob Reuter Birthday show here.

link: Riverfront Times
link: Cowboy Angel Foundation

We Are Living in the Golden Age of Band T-Shirts

August 8, 2014 Leave a comment

RFT500BEACHBOYS-thumb-500x500

Today’s Band T-Shirt Trends Are Getting Ridiculous and Awesome
By Jaime Lees
Fri., Aug. 8 2014

Band shirts used to be a way to easily identify other members of your tribe. It was a method of claiming allegiance without saying a word, a way to help find other like-minded people. People wore their love on their sleeves, quite literally. Back in the day you couldn’t just creep on somebody’s FaceSpace profile or look up their online playlists to find out their tastes in music, so kids who wanted to rep their favorite band had to wear the dang shirt. I know when I was a young lass, I was certainly intrigued by any gentleman wearing a Dinosaur Jr. t-shirt. (Bad move. Most dudes who like Dinosaur Jr. are emotionally damaged beyond repair. I am prepared to argue this point at length.)

And while there were t-shirt ordering magazines (remember Rockabilia?), for the most part to get the dang t-shirt you had to go to the show. So the shirt didn’t just mean that you liked the band, it meant that you showed up for the band, which spoke even more to your devotion.

When I was a teenager, band shirts usually didn’t come in smaller sizes or tailored for women. Kids these days are so spoiled, I swear. We had one choice: wear the XL or nothin’, so we walked around like dopes with giant sheet-like T-shirts that draped from our collarbones down to our knees. The shirts were ill-fitting (especially if you’re like me and have a bountiful bosom) and of poor quality, but we walked uphill in the snow both ways to get get them, goshdarnit.

Nowadays I’m far too picky for such shenanigans. I’d feel dumpy in an XL sized men’s shirt and, well, I just don’t want to talk to strangers. Creeps often see band t-shirts as a way to make contact and I don’t want to be bothered. I don’t want to talk to them about the bands we have in common and I don’t want to feel obligated to explain to them about bands that they don’t know. And I certainly don’t want to get trapped into having to give some stranger dude a high-five because we both like Echo & the Bunnymen or whatever.

You like whatever music you like and I’ll like whatever music I like and we can just leave each other alone. I’m old and cranky.

But sometimes I see a band shirt that makes me change my policy. Band t-shirts have gotten so much more interesting in recent years and there have been trends that I can totally get behind when it comes to band fashion.

Like all members of my generation, I’m a sucker for things that are clever and when I saw the Beach Boys / Black Flag one I had to buy it, even though I’m still not sure how to wear it.

It’s two bands in one, see?

I’m a big fan of the Black Flag logo. Probably a bigger fan of the logo than the band, even. It’s so great. It’s simple and unmistakable and representative and everything that a good logo should be and, man, there are a lot of Black Flag parody t-shirts and other items out there for sale. A small sampling from our friend Google:

RFT500BLACKFLAG

Another of the all-time great band logos came to us from the Ramones. Designed by graphic artist Arturo Vega (long time art director for the Ramones), it is a rip of the US Presidential seal and it has since been aped, itself, in various hilarious fashions.

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My favorite trend in music merchandise is this one particular style where a shirt appears to be advertising one entertainer, but is actually showing another. My winner in this category is the Nirvana / Rihanna shirt. It’s so delicious. Even setting aside my special interest in both Nirvana’s music and Rihanna’s life, this one still gets me. It’s that subtle little detail in the mark below the eye. Well done.

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Other stand-outs in this category include these purposefully (and hilariously) mislabeled shirts featuring Lou Reed / Iggy Pop, Bob Marley / Jimi Hendrix, RuPaul / Beyonce and Blur / Oasis. So cheeky. So trying-to-make-me-buy-them.

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And check out my friend Sam rocking the amazing Beyoncé / Misfits mash-up:

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Tons of band logos have also been mocked by genius specialty company Monsters of Grok. Here, you can find the names of all of your favorite scientists and philosophers presented on shirts in familiar logo form. Show off your smarts, rocker. Witness:

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The final greatest newer trend in band shirts is minimalist-designed apparel. It’s popular trend applied in many formats, but can be especially appreciated by music-minded architecture snobs and font fetishists. (I’ll admit: I’m guilty here.) These stylized screens are usually engineered to distill a band down to its essential core: its members. I’ve seen this style in person many times and just a few weeks ago a roadie for Veruca Salt smiled and pressed this guitar pick into my palm as thanks for supplying his singer with some ibuprofen.

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What’s your favorite T-shirt trend? Are you a grown-up who still buys and wears new band T-shirts? They seem so much more fun now and I’d like to get with some of these new designs. Teach me how to wear these things again without having to do some complicated, elaborate upcycling artistry. Maybe pillow cases are easy enough to make, right? And buy me this because I need it. I don’t know why, but I need it:

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link: Riverfront Times

link: the Village Voice

The Baseball Project – Critic’s Pick

August 4, 2014 Leave a comment
The Baseball Project: The Baseball Project - Linda Pitmon, Scott McCaughey, Mike Mills, and Steve Wynn (press photo)

The Baseball Project: The Baseball Project – Linda Pitmon, Scott McCaughey, Mike Mills, and Steve Wynn (press photo)

The Baseball Project w/ Water Liars
by Jaime Lees
It’s a band. That plays songs about baseball. That’s all. But the aptly named Baseball Project isn’t some county fair novelty act, it’s a modern day supergroup. The players drafted to this musical team include Scott McCaughey (Young Fresh Fellows) Steve Wynn (The Dream Syndicate), Linda Pitmon (Zuzu’s Petals) and Peter Buck and Mike Mills of R.E.M. fame. Songs like “Extra Inning of Love” and “Monument Park” carry titles that push the sporty theme, but these cuts are more than that; they’re stories told through the filter of the game. The bands melodies glow with a warm, familiar fuzz-pop sound– reminding listeners that these musicians shaped America’s musical history in the same way that The Babe shaped America’s pastime.

The Baseball Project
8:00 p.m. August 6
Blueberry Hill
6504 Delmar Blvd. University City, MO
314-727-4444
Price: $15

link: Riverfront Times

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