Tag Archive | Yoko Ono

Full Circle with The Flaming Lips: 2012 In Review

Flaming Lips at LouFest. Photo by Khoolod Eid.

Flaming Lips at LouFest. Photo by Khoolod Eid.

Full Circle with The Flaming Lips: 2012 In Review
By Jaime Lees
Thu., Dec. 20 2012 at 11:54 AM

Editor’s Note: The end of 2012 is upon us (also the end of the world, if you believe in that sort of thing), so we thought we’d put a cap on things by sharing some of our personal favorite shows, albums, events and general shenanigans. Join us as we indulge in some navel-gazing!

When I write articles for RFT Music, I’m not just reporting on music happenings — I’m writing about my life. One day my priorities might change, but for now what matters the most to me is music. Maybe that’s wrong or unhealthy or something, but it’s true, and luckily most of my favorite music moments of 2012 have been documented in some way on these pages.

I’m lucky in that I have a lot of freedom in this space. It’s curated not only by people who give a crap, but by people who value what I have to offer. After seven years of writing for this publication, I’m still grateful and excited for the opportunity. I absolutely adore my job here at RFT Music. My life is my work and my work is my life, and I’m honored to share it with you.

That said, here was my life in 2012:

I rang in the New Year in Oklahoma City. My sweet old dog, Ruby, had just passed and I was in the middle of some serious grief. I ran away for the weekend to hang out with old friends and see two shows with the Flaming Lips and my spirit animal, Yoko Ono. At the stroke of midnight, I was tipsy on pink lemonade moonshine, bathed in kisses and standing inside a massive sonic blast fortified by a fog of rainbow confetti, flashing lights, jumping lasers, hundreds of bright balloons and the twinkling reflections off of a giant disco ball. The Lips played Beatles covers with Yoko and Sean Lennon and Nels Cline; it was absolute bliss and served as a strong reminder of the healing power of live music.

Flaming Lips and Yoko Ono - JAIMEVILLE.COM

I’ve been saved again and again by amazing music — most of it local. I’m a huge fan of so many of our local bands. Many people wait years for their favorite bands to tour, but for me, my favorite bands play all the time. As an extra treat, I get the opportunity to write about these St. Louis music makers: Lion’s Daughter, Prince Ea, Jimmy Griffin, Jans Project, Demonlover, Roland Johnson, Fred Friction, Nelly and the list goes on and on. I know that a lot of what I write reads as love letters to St. Louis, but I just can’t help myself — St. Louis just makes it too easy. Stop being so awesome and I’ll stop writing about you. Until then, the locals have my heart. (Extra double shout-out to people that I’m proud to call my friends, the hard-working folks at Big Muddy Records, Tower Groove Records and the Rats & People Motion Picture Orchestra.)

I’m not sure why, but this year I felt particularly productive. I was given space to write about music-minded locals who inspire me creatively (Dana Smith), about St. Louis music history (STL 2000) and I got to hype the touring bands that I was the most excited about (Future of the Left, R. Ring). I’m still not quite over the fact that I actually get paid to get drunk and watch Guided by Voices, to eat pizza and listen to Taylor Swift, to try to convince readers that Heart is badass, to watch classic bands like Kiss and Mötley Crüe, to review Madonna from the second row, to jump into the world of Juggalos, to get Sinead O’Connor‘s take on St. Louis (and Chuck Berry) and to praise my personal heroes like Bonnie Raitt and Henry Rollins. If you can find a girl that is luckier than me, I’d sure like to meet her.

Under the advice of my very favorite punk rock couple, I attended a show with a band I’d never heard before: I saw Useless Eaters at CBGB and it was the best damn show I saw all year. These kinds of happy accidents only occur when you actually listen to the suggestions of others, so try keep some cooler-than-you friends around.

And though I was stoked on the lineup this year at our big summer festival, LouFest, I had originally declined to do any LouFest coverage. I wanted a weekend of fun, without having to spend all night writing reviews. But there was a last-minute rescheduling and Kiernan came and found me right before Dinosaur Jr played. He needed someone to write about Dino’s set. I said sure, knowing that it would actually be easy– on some level I’d been prepared to review a Dino show for at least half of my life. Kiernan hunted down an empty beer box for me to write on and then he went back out into the crowd, off on his next mission. I found a pen, ducked under a friend’s umbrella and wrote my notes out on the cardboard. Improvising ain’t just for musicians, you know, and the Dino review turned out to be one of my favorite things that I wrote all year.

The second night of LouFest, I again found myself at the emotional mercy of the Flaming Lips live show, but this time as a participant. I danced onstage with some of my favorite people, and I absolutely rocked that slutty Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz costume, if I do say so myself. It was one of the best days of my life and it’s far too personal to write about here, but trust me, it was a good time and I felt absolutely smothered in love.

Since then my life and routines have gotten back on schedule, and this fall has been one great event after the last, and with the upcoming holiday season is bringing tons of shows that I’m excited about– I predict that I won’t get much sleep through the end of the year.

As for the future, who knows? I’m excited about the new crop of weirdness on the South Side. Magic City, Black James, Syna So Pro, Demonlover, Bug Chaser and Horsey Drawers have my interest right now, but nobody can predict what insanity will come in 2013. I, for one, can’t wait. Bring on the New Year. I’ll be lurking in the many venues, festivals, dark basements, loud practice spaces and fancy recording studios around town. See you at the barricades.

link: Riverfront Times

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Yoko Ono’s New iPhone App, #smilesfilm, Aims to Capture Every Smile in the World

Yoko Ono’s New iPhone App, #smilesfilm, Aims to Capture Every Smile in the World
By Jaime Lees
Mon., Jun. 18 2012 at 12:19 PM

Yoko Ono’s new iPhone app, #smiles film, was released this week and with it comes an opportunity for fans to participate in Ono’s latest art project.

Yoko Ono famously won John Lennon’s heart when he attended one of her art shows and he saw that she was presenting a positive message. Once LennOno became a couple, they used whatever resources they had available (time, money, the Amsterdam Hilton) to push their message of optimism, action and peace.

One of the projects that Ono has been working on is the Smiles Film. It’s an ambitious undertaking. In her own words:

“My ultimate goal in film-making is to make a film which includes a smiling face snap of every single human being in the world.”

This sounds like some hippie shit — and it is — but that doesn’t mean that she won’t at least try to get it done. The logistics of this endeavor are inconceivable, but Ono is the eternal optimist. And she’s done the impossible before. Ono thinks globally and acts grandly, which is why she’s now introducing the #smilesfilm iPhone app. In the free app, users can take a photo of themselves smiling and submit it to Ono’s ongoing project. Other methods of submission are enouraged, too, including adding the appropriate hashtag to any picture uploaded to Twitter or Instagram.

The photos are also geotagged by participants. This step allows for a cool interactive feature on the app and the website. Even though Ono has yet to capture every smile in the world (her website currently counts a little more than a thousand submissions), users can click on a map and see a smile. This means that users can see all of the smiles that have been submitted in their own city, or from any other city of their choosing. If Ono’s mission is to connect people through smiles, and that goal is accomplished each time anyone takes a peep at that map.

For more information: The website for the project, smilesfilm.com, launched today.

Bob Gruen Is a Rock & Roll Primary Source

The Clash by Bob Gruen

Bob Gruen Is a Rock & Roll Primary Source
By Jaime Lees
Thursday, Nov 10 2011

New York-based photographer Bob Gruen is a rock & roll icon. From photographing some of the earliest concerts of Ike and Tina Turner to chronicling months on tour with bands such as the Clash and the Sex Pistols, Gruen has done it all. He always seemed to be in the right place at the right time, capturing loving and candid shots of both emerging and established artists including the Rolling Stones, the Ramones, Blondie, Led Zeppelin, Patti Smith and New York Dolls.

Decades of constant documenting yielded many famous photographs and subjects, including John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Gruen befriended the couple in their New York years and shot some of the most iconic, enduring photos of Lennon, among them the one of Lennon wearing the sleeveless New York City ringer T-shirt and the photo where he’s flashing the peace sign in front of the Statue of Liberty.

Gruen’s newest book, Rock Seen, serves as a collection of the photographer’s favorite shots from throughout his 40-year career — he also wrote captions and included behind-the-scenes stories to accompany the photographs. We spoke to Gruen in advance of his appearance this week at the St. Louis Jewish Book Festival and asked him about his work habits, past projects and plans for the future.

Chuck Berry by Bob Gruen

Jaime Lees: Part of what I like about your work is that you seem to be a fan first, and I think that it shows in your photos.

Bob Gruen: Yes, well, that’s because I didn’t choose to have a career. I was a child of the ’60s. You know, “Turn on, tune in and drop out”? And I did. I lived with a rock & roll band because I like rock & roll music, and I tend to be friends with musicians and performers and artists. And when they got a record deal the company used my pictures. And then they hired me to take more pictures, and every time I would go and do that I’d meet more people who would hire me to do more photos. And I just kind of fell into this career of rock photography. It wasn’t something I sought out — I really wasn’t planning to have any career. I was pretty aimless as a kid. I really wasn’t expecting much to happen. [Laughs] I couldn’t really do a nine-to-five. Like, my parents were sort of trying to get me into a nine-to-five office career, which didn’t appeal to me at all, especially the nine o’clock part. [Laughs] So that’s why I was living with a rock band, and it just kind of turned out that that’s what I was suited for and that’s what I ended up doing.

In spite of myself I have a strong work ethic. I figured out what it is: It’s because I really don’t like to work. And until I finish something, I feel that I’m working because I live in my studio. And if I came home at night and the film wasn’t developed, I’d have to do it the next day, and I had other things to do the next day. So I’d tend to go out and spend the night hanging out with friends and drinking and carrying on, and then I’d come home, and it’s four or five o’clock in the morning, and I’d develop the film.

How do you decide where you’re going to go shoot if you’re not on assignment?

Oh, if I’m not on assignment, I go to see friends or bands that friends recommend, pretty much. I’m not really looking for the next big thing. I never was. Usually the bands that I like don’t make it. [Laughs]

I still go out all the time, but I don’t work as much as I used to. Photography has changed nowadays; it’s much more accessible, so a lot more people are involved in photography. A lot more groups are doing their own work; a lot of groups are much more restrictive. Record companies got much more corporate, and they want to own the images.

And you have less access now.

Yeah, they control the access a lot more, and it’s not as interesting for me. They came up with a three-song rule, where you’re only allowed to take pictures for the first three songs of a group, and I was never into it in that sense of just being on assignment to take a picture of a guy onstage to show what color shirt he’s wearing. To me, I was always more involved as a fan, as somebody who really likes the music, and I wanted to capture the feeling and the passion of what’s going on. And a lot of times that doesn’t happen in the first three songs. Usually in the last three songs, not the first ones. [Laughs] When all of the lights are on, and all of the effects that the band has brought with them are on, and the band is really putting it all out, and the audience is really pumped up, and you have much more excitement and much more feeling — that’s what I’d rather photograph.

I do tend to think of myself as a photojournalist, but I didn’t visit this lifestyle as a journalist. I live this lifestyle, I’ve always been friends with musicians and artists; I feel very comfortable there. So that many times if I had an assignment to go to Madison Square Garden and shoot a band, I’d do that, but after that on my own, as a person, I’d go down to CBGB or Max’s just to hang out. And, you know, I like staying up late. I like going to clubs and hanging out with people, so that wasn’t really an assignment, it was just something I did in my life.

Yeah, you were just kickin’ it. So what’s your next big project?

Well, in December I have to go do an exhibition that we’re putting on in Buenos Aires, sponsored by the American Embassy down there.

Wow! Does it get any bigger than that? I mean, that’s huge!

I don’t know; it’s pretty big. They’ve done more and more events, but not many people in rock & roll are sponsored by the embassy, that’s for sure! But they’re starting to come around. I mean, rock & roll is not teenage music. When Bob Dylan played at Newport, I got my first photo pass there, so I was down front when he played with a rock & roll band, so a lot of people were very upset about that. But over the years I’ve thought about it, and I think what Bob Dylan was doing was kind of making the statement that rock & roll is the folk music of America.

Now we have people like the New York Times recognizing rock & roll; it’s part of our culture. A lot of the magazines did not cover rock & roll or rock stars. There were music magazines, but Life magazine or the New York Times didn’t really review rock & roll at all. Nowadays, you’ll see a review of the Lollapalooza tour or Bonnaroo. We just had the CMJ festival in New York, and there was a big story in the Times about that. It’s becoming more and more regular, but I’m old enough to recognize that it didn’t happen 20 years ago, 30 years ago. Rock & roll was not a part of mainstream culture.

I just met a CEO of a major corporation the other day, and he was telling me about going out just about every night of the week to some different rock show, and he had this big smile like a teenager. And people who are into rock & roll tend to stay young in feeling. It keeps you excited and alive in a sense.

Well, I was at a rock show until 2:30 a.m. last night, and I can’t say that I feel all that excited or alive today…

[Laughs] Well, the next morning is a little difficult, but it is fun at night. I mean, for me rock & roll is about the freedom to express your feelings…loudly. I think that’s what people really like about it.

LINK: Bonus interview outtakes 

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore And The Four Biggest Rock And Roll Breakups

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore And The Four Biggest Rock And Roll Breakups
By Jaime Lees
Wed., Oct. 19 2011 at 10:33 AM

​Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth have separated after 27 years of marriage and now the future of the band is unknown. Their record label released this statement last Friday:

Musicians Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore, married in 1984, are announcing they have separated. Sonic Youth, with both Kim and Thurston involved, will proceed with its South American tour dates in November. Plans beyond that tour are uncertain. The couple has requested respect for their personal privacy and does not wish to issue further comment.

It feels kind of gross to discuss this news. (And not just because the couple requested privacy.) It’s weird to think about their separation because Gordon/Moore were not just the biggest couple of the alternative generation but because they were also the most respected. To the outside world, they had the perfect relationship. They were in love, married with a talented daughter, and together they were one half of the greatest indie rock band in history.

But they never flaunted their bond. They weren’t always holding hands in band photographs or anything like that. In fact, in the beginning of the band, they seemed to make a point to stand apart from one another. Because of the careful, private way they carried their love, they seemed untouchable. And strong. They were held up by admirers as the perfect rock and roll couple, an example of how cool love and marriage could be.

Fans and journalists alike were respectful of their relationship. I’ve interviewed both of them, and I never had the balls to ask either of them about the other. In our conversation a couple of summers ago, Gordon brought up Moore and was very complimentary about him. She also spoke about her daughter, but it still felt inappropriate to ask her too much about her home life. It felt like prying — like if I got her to talk about it that I would be tricking her into doing something that I knew she didn’t want to do.

And, really, there was no reason to ask about her home life. Both Gordon and Moore are prolific musicians, writers, poets and artists. There’s plenty of interesting ground to cover. Together and separately, they are both workaholics, releasing a staggering amount of art in various formats. One of their accomplishments together is the release of seventeen studio albums in the bands 30-year career.

And any fan who has listened to the last few albums could have made predictions of this breakup. It would be a mistake for any outsider to claim that that these songs are autobiographical, but there is a definite story arc from “I Love You, Golden Blue” through to “Turquoise Boy” then “Antenna” and “Massage the History” on the bands last release, The Eternal. The last few albums seemed more somber, more contemplative.

Combine that with the fact that the other Sonic Youth band members, Steve Shelley and Lee Ranaldo, seemed to be actively building other lives for themselves outside of the band, and the potential demise of Sonic Youth doesn’t seem too shocking. Shelley is all set up as the drummer for Chicago-based band Disappears, and he’s been touring with them for a while. It would be easy to change the category on the Disappears from “other” band to “primary” band. And Ranaldo is suddenly everywhere. He’s started an official Facebook page, he’s making music and his website has become increasingly active- most notably with his photojournalistic endeavors. Ranaldo’s posts his photos on his website and it has become one of the best sources for his on-the-street documentation of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Gordon has been absent lately. Laying low, one would suppose. Moore had a personal blog where he would post his writings, photos of his daughter, tributes to poets he admired, etc, but the blog was deleted over the weekend. Moore is still active publicly, even conducting a thoughtful, funny interview with Henry Rollins about his new book on the day of the announcement.

Yes, the separation is hard on the fans, too. And that’s unfair to Gordon and Moore, but it’s the truth. It’s a lot of weight to put on one couple. Before, fans would think to themselves: Maybe my parents got divorced, maybe I just got dumped, maybe my marriage is a disaster, but Kim and Thurston were still together- so true love exists! Now admirers must accept that Gordon and Moore are just like us. Not an infallible supercouple, but two people who also have to deal with the consequences of unraveling love. (And if you think your ex won’t go away, try being together for 30 years, being known world-wide and having to deal with nosy journalists and fans.)

But perhaps Gordon and Moore can still be our role models. But instead of being part of the relationship that we most glorify, they can be an example to show us how to handle even the biggest, messiest, most heart-breaking of breakups with dignity.

And while they are unique in their place in fans’ hearts, but there have been quite a few other separations between couples who made music together. Below we explore some other famous inter-band rock and roll relationships with breakups and the outcome of each.

4. Jack White and Meg White of the White Stripes

These peppermint-colored cuties hit the scene in the late ’90s as a catchy throw-back garage duo. Back then they claimed that they were brother and sister, which was believable enough given their shared look — alabaster skin and black hair. As it turns out, they were husband and wife. They’d been married for a few years and actually divorced in early 2000, just as the White Stripes were getting super-popular. Jack later said that he invented the sibling story (and a few other fake back-stories) so that the press would focus on their music rather than their relationship. It was the opposite of Fleetwood Mac. Instead of exploiting their relationship, they denied it altogether. This, of course, just made fans all the more curious and throughout their career their exact relationship was the source of much speculation. The White Stripes officially disbanded early this year, but the Whites seem to have an okay relationship. Both had remarried and Meg even had her wedding ceremony in Jack’s backyard. Just this summer Jack announced his divorce from his second wife, model Karen Elson, but relationship downers don’t seem to put a dent his productivity. Jack’s latest band is alt-rock supergroup the Dead Weather and he continues to play with the jaw-droppingly talented Brendan Benson in the Raconteurs.

3. Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac

This is easily the most famous rock and roll breakup in classic rock. Fleetwood Mac, as a band, built its whole career on relationship turmoil. The classic album Rumours is a product of that turmoil, and in this case the lyrics were certainly autobiographical. In the band, there were two couples breaking up — not just Nicks and Buckingham, but also Christine McVie and John McVie. This charged atmosphere created some of the best SoCal tunes of the decade. It also resonated with listeners: Rumours has sold 40 million units worldwide. Back in the day, those songs really held a lot of meaning — both sadness and contempt. Buckingham’s “Go Your Own Way” was particularly harsh on his former lover — it basically called her a slut (Which is debatable, honestly, since she slept with drummer Mick Fleetwood after the breakup with Buckingham). In any case, it was a scathing song that accused her of being a heartless skank. But it was a hit, so Nicks had to sing it on stage with Buckingham every night. Still, once the bitterness blew over, this is the one case where a serious breakup actually aided the longevity of the band. Now, whenever they’ve come together as Fleetwood Mac, they take every opportunity to play-up their former relationship, knowing that their old lady fans just love the sexual tension. Just watch the second half of the video for “Silver Springs” from 1997’s The Dance. The on-stage theatrics are out of control. And the fans love it. Since their heyday, all parties have had varying degrees of success in their solo careers. And if it’s broken down into a competition between Nicks and Buckingham, it’s hard to say who would win. Nicks is more well known but Buckingham is still mighty handsome and talented.

2. Ike and Tina Turner of the Ike & Tina Turner Revue

Ike Turner is credited as one of the inventors of rock and roll. In fact, he’s included in the short list as one of the dudes who (possibly) released the first rock and roll record. Yes, he was also a major jerkburger, but his musical pedigree cannot be stepped to. Ike met and hired a teenage Anna Mae Bullock as a background singer in the late 1950s. He gave her the stage name of Tina and the two began both a very successful career and a shit-tastic marriage. Ike was widely reported to be a controlling, easily angered woman-beater. Tina finally left him in 1976 and the divorce was finalized two years later. Ike got to keep all of the money, and Tina famously asked the court for one thing only: her name. They didn’t make music together again. Following their separation, Ike didn’t really exercise his talent. He spent some time in prison as a result of his drug addictions, and died in 2007 of a cocaine overdose. Tina, however, went on to build an impressive solo career on the merit of her distinctive voice, sexy legs and survivor status.

1. John Lennon and Yoko Ono

Even though everyone always hated on Ono, she was Lennon’s main musical partner in his life after the Beatles. She was also his partner in life. Like it or not, the two of them had one of the biggest, most well-documented romances in rock and roll history. She was an artist before she was even with Lennon, and she brought her vision to what they produced together. Against all odds, their partnership and love flourished. They lived as two halves of one whole, and Lennon wouldn’t do much without her by his side. What people forget, though, is that they separated for a while in late 1973. The couple had been under a lot of stress. Lennon was being skewered in the press for abandoning his nice, blonde, white wife and child for his weird, yelping Japanese artist. He was also facing deportation from a McCarthyist American government, who despised him for having a voice. When he spoke out against injustices or war, people listened, and he was considered a threat to national security. Also, Lennon had fidelity issues.

Faced with all of this pressure, the couple needed a break and Ono requested a separation. Lennon historians call this time period “The Lost Weekend,” but the separation really lasted for nearly a year and a half. During this time Lennon spent some months living in Los Angeles, hanging out with scenesters at the Troubadour and drinking far too much. When he was in LA, he was, by all accounts, a hot mess. Eventually Ono took him back, after which he seemed slightly broken, but happy in his relief. He had shed some of that famous Lennon ego and become a more humble, sensitive man. They were older, calmer, and they finally settled down together. And just when it seemed as though Lennon and Ono would live happily forever together in the Dakota, their time together was ended forever by Mark David Chapman and four bullets. The legacy of this relationship will live on in perpetuum as the rock and roll Romeo and Juliet. Ono has continued her own music career, and was recording an album with Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore just earlier this year.

Frances Bean Cobain And The Other Nine Hottest Offspring Of Musicians

Frances Bean Cobain And The Other Nine Hottest Offspring Of Musicians
By Jaime Lees
Thu., Aug. 18 2011

​Today is Frances Bean Cobain’s 19th birthday. Time flies, right? In celebration of Miss Frannie, we’ve compiled a list of hot rock ‘n’ roll spawn. These people have at least one rock star parent and their moms are frequently models. (Figures.) They are all totally bangable, and many of them have their own interesting careers. Who do you think should be added to the list?

Frances Bean Cobain
Daughter of musicians Kurt Cobain of Nirvana and Courtney Love of Hole
Frances was on the “countdown to legal” list for many grunge fans. Now, at age 19 FBC has just posed for a collection of photographs that show that she’s all grown up. Eyes! Lips! Midriff! Décolletage! Tattoos! It’s all there, in this frequently topless but never outright scandalous set of photographs. Captured in dramatic black and white, “The Bean” looks absolutely smokin’. She’s sultry, she’s sassy and she looks like she’s either going to scream at you or make out with you or both. HOT.

Liv Tyler
Daughter of musician Steven Tyler of Aerosmith and scenester / groupie Bebe Buell
The quintessential foxy rock ‘n’ roll daughter, Liv first came to attention starring in Aerosmith’s video for “Crazy.” In the video, she played a pouty-lipped Catholic school girl who skipped school do naughty pseudo-sapphic stuff with co-star Alicia Silverstone. She’s since put her big lips on the big screen, with major roles in films like Empire Records, Armageddon and Lord of the Rings.

Sean Lennon
Son of Beatle John Lennon and artist / musician Yoko Ono
Sean is probably the most famous son of rock. Lookin’ like exactly half of each of his parents, the bespectacled musician doesn’t have to push his pedigree, it is already obvious in his pretty eyes and cute little mouth. Bonus: Sean seems nice, his music is good and he doesn’t disrespect his father’s legacy (unlike Lennon’s other son, jerk-ass Julian). And like a proper second generation famous kid, he has dated Mick Jagger’s daughter Elizabeth and also…

Bijou Phillips
Daughter of John Phillips of the Mamas & the Papas and model Geneviève Waïte
Young Bijou is a looker, but not really in a classic way. Her teeth are kinda weird and her vibe is kinda dirty, but these things somehow just make her damn sexy. She famously lost her virginity to Evan Dando and the hot little hippie has been banging famous dudes ever since. She was with Elijah Wood, then she dated Sean Lennon for years and now she’s engaged to Danny Masterson (aka “Hyde” from That ’70s show).

Zoë Kravitz
Daughter of musician Lenny Kravitz and actress Lisa Bonet
It’s absolutely shocking that Zoë Kravitz is good looking. Both of her parents are so. damn. hot. that it only makes sense that their individual hot qualities would get canceled out in war for gene dominance, leaving just a sad little unremarkable, unhot blob baby. Instead, the biology lottery resulted in Zoë becoming mega hot broad with a tight little body, her dad’s sense of style and her mom’s creamy skin. Yowza.

​Jackson Smith
Son of musicians Patti Smith and Fred “Sonic” Smith of the MC5
Jackson looks sweetly disheveled in that slightly scruffy post-hipster way. He plays guitar for his mom on tour and his good looks are a little distracting on stage- he has bright eyes and the same kind of quiet intensity that both of his parents pulled off in photographs. Also, he was cool enough to score Meg White of the White Stripes as his wife, which means the world might get a third generation of Detroit hotties.

Nicole Richie
Daughter of musician Lionel Richie and Brenda Harvey
Nicole was adopted, so she can’t claim her good looks from Lionel or Brenda. But she was adopted from the famous musical Escovedo family, and can count Sheila E. and Alejandro Escovedo as some of her close biological relatives. The doe-eyed former party girl has had public struggles with her weight and the law, but nothing obscures her natural good looks and funny personality. In the grand tradition of celeb spawn, Nicole dated DJ AM (Adam Goldstein) and is now married to Good Charlotte’s Joel Madden.

​Dweezil Zappa
Son of musician Frank Zappa and Adelaide Gail Sloatman
Just like his father, Dweezil is an acquired taste. His bright eyes are intense and surely one of the features that won over former girlfriend (and librarian glasses enthusiast) Lisa Loeb. Yeah, he seems like he can be kind of a douche, but that doesn’t cancel out his dark, almost John Stamos-y sexiness. Fun facts: Dweezil was an MTV VJ for a minute and has many musical credits to his name (including playing lead guitar on the the Fat Boys’ “Wipe Out”). He also had a bit part in Pretty in Pink as Andie’s friend Simon- this lil’ cameo automatically puts him in the Forever Hot Club.

Nicholas Des Barres
Son of musician Michael Des Barres and original groupie Pamela Des Barres
Best known as Murdoc on MacGuyver and the dude who replaced Robert Palmer in Power Station, Michael Des Barres has an interesting career as both an actor and a rock singer. His former wife, the beautiful Pamela Des Barres, is an author, a ginger and legendary groupie. Together they made Nick, who is tall and handsome with a striking blend of features from both of his parents. He’s also probably the most talented person on this list, finding success an actor, a writer and a designer.

​Ione Skye
Daughter of musician Donovan and model Enid Karl
Best known as Diane Court from Say Anything, the object of Lloyd Dobler’s affection won over teen audiences with her fresh face, crooked smile and quirky mannerisms. Basically, all straight men of a certain generation will always think that Ione Skye is just the hottest shit ever. She could have pretty much any dude she wants, but Ione keeps up the tradition of inter-industry dating: she dated Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, she was married to Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys for a few years and she’s now married to musician Ben Lee.

Honorable mentions:

Daisy Lowe – Daughter of Gavin Rossdale of Bush and Pearl Lowe
Sally Taylor – Daughter of musicians / songwriters James Taylor and Carly Simon
Amber Le Bon – Daughter of Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran and model Yasmin Le Bon
Elizabeth Jagger – Daughter of musician Mick Jagger and model Jerry Hall, dated Sean Lennon
Riley Keough – Granddaughter of Elvis Presley, Daughter of Lisa Marie Presley
Rufus and Martha Wainwright – Musician children of Loudon Wainwright III, songwriter / singer
Peaches Geldof – Daughter of Bob Geldof, musician, and Paula Yates, Brit television presenter
Alexa Ray Joel – Daughter of musician Billy Joel and model Christie Brinkley
Elijah Blue Allman – Son of musicians Cher and Gregg Allmann
Stella McCartney – Daughter of Beatle Paul McCartney and photographer Linda McCartney

  • Riverfront Times – link
  • FBC photo shoot #1 link
  • FBC photo shoot #2 link