Tag Archive | Bob Dylan

President Obama’s Greatest Musical Moments

obamadiscoball

A still from a joke video that was used on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, one of the first places that the President danced for a national audience.

President Obama’s Greatest Musical Moments
By Jaime Lees
Tue, Jan 10, 2017

When Barack Hussein Obama was elected President of the United States, it seemed like anything was possible. The fabled American Dream was alive and thriving. We voted for hope and change and we got them both balanced on the shoulders of a man who seemed capable of expertly executing the job.

Now, with only days left on the clock until our country comes under the power of a known psychopath, we mourn what we’re losing and look to the future with appropriate horror. It seems entirely possible that President Obama might go down in history as not just the first African-American president but also the last great American president. Ever. He wasn’t perfect, of course. Like all politicians, he could be hugely disappointing and his public silence and inaction on some matters felt brutal. But it seems safe to say that very (very) soon we will look back on President Obama’s time in office as a golden era.

Not only was he an accomplished, charismatic and dignified leader, he was personable in a style that we’ve never before experienced. And one of the most effective and consistent ways that he connected with the American people was through music.

President Obama used music to showcase his personality and his compassion. He was never shy about expressing how deeply a song or a musician moved him. We knew his opinions on popular artists and it made him more relatable. We also knew that our president sometimes felt compelled to sing or to do a little shimmy. We even knew what he listened to on Spotify. And we loved it all.

Below is a collection of President Obama’s greatest musical moments. Thanks for the great work and the excellent music, Mr. President. We’d love another spin.

……..

This should’ve been our first indication that President Obama was going to be bumping. Here he is as a candidate, dancing his way onto The Ellen DeGeneres Show, as is the tradition:

Here’s Chi-town’s own Barry O joining Mick Jagger, Buddy Guy and BB King at the White House for a few lines of “Sweet Home Chicago”:

Check out President Panty Dropper singing Al Green. That little bite of the lip! He really puts the “O” in Oval Office. It was kind of nice to have a President that was attractive and virile. (There’s no chance of that with the next guy.):

The White House hosted a tribute to Ray Charles, giving our main man another opportunity to showcase his pipes:

Many were charmed when Obama spontaneously sang “Purple Rain” to a kid dressed as Prince last Halloween:

He and Michelle also did an endearing little dance to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”:

President Obama invited Kendrick Lamar to perform at the White House on the 4th of July. Yeah, let that one sink in for a minute:

He awarded Bruce Springsteen the Presidential Medal of Freedom saying, in part, “I am the President; he is the Boss”:

He also awarded Bob Dylan the Presidential Medal of Freedom and then later gave us a peek into how the whole experience went down with Mr. Freewheelin’:

Let’s take a minute to appreciate that we had a black President who frequently celebrated music made by black artists while he was living in the Whitest of Houses. About damn time, right? Over the years President Obama has served as host for a wide range of African-American artists including Alicia Keys, Aretha Franklin, Beyoncé, Common, Janelle Monáe, Jay-Z, Jill Scott, John Legend, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Usher and the Roots. Here’s Obama singing “Jingle Bells” with Chance the Rapper at the most recent Christmas tree lighting ceremony. (Chance’s dad was Obama’s state director back in his Illinois days.):

In this clip the Obamas dance as a pre-Lemonade Beyonce sings the timeless 1941 classic “At Last,” made famous by Etta James in 1960:

Barack and Michelle danced a lot, actually. Dancing is where their passions meet, as it combines Barack’s passion for music with Michelle’s passion for getting active. In this video they’re trying the tango, but President Obama was known for dancing all across the world, from Alaska to Kenya:

And here they are having an impromptu boogie to “Uptown Funk” with R2D2 and a stormtrooper. They always seemed to have fun:

President Obama somehow even managed to make Jimmy Fallon’s moronic show tolerable for a few short minutes when he showed up to slow-jam the news:

Here’s a recent video from Usher of the President dancing to “Hotline Bling.” #Lit:

The President was also down with the kids, happily hosting his own festival called South By South Lawn on the grounds of the White House:

And here’s our boyfriend trying not to sing along with Aretha Franklin during Carole King’s Kennedy Center Honors ceremony. Was that a tear? And yes, even the President must stand when Aretha takes off her fur:

We saved the best for last. In this video, President Obama paused to sing “Amazing Grace” while presenting the eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney after Pinckney and his fellow church members were executed in a racially motivated mass shooting in North Carolina. The universally moving song was adopted by southern gospel culture decades ago and it was the perfect expression of President Obama’s humanity and a grieving nation:

Until next time, Obama.

link: Riverfront Times

Advertisements

Bob Dylan – Critic’s Pick

Bob Dylan Jaimeville
Bob Dylan
7:00 p.m. April 23
Peabody Opera House
14th St. and Market St.
St. Louis, MO 63103

He’s the celebrated poet-laureate of rock and roll, but Bob Dylan’s credits extend beyond his trademark cadence and twisted wordsmith skills. With a career spanning five decades in the public eye, Dylan is king to not just his contemporaries, but nearly every singer-songwriter since. From scruffy underdog to lauded international pop icon, Dylan is more than just a simple protest musician who famously dared to “go electric” at a folk music festival; he’s the gold standard.
— By Jaime Lees

link: Riverfront Times

Bob Gruen Is a Rock & Roll Primary Source

The Clash by Bob Gruen

Bob Gruen Is a Rock & Roll Primary Source
By Jaime Lees
Thursday, Nov 10 2011

New York-based photographer Bob Gruen is a rock & roll icon. From photographing some of the earliest concerts of Ike and Tina Turner to chronicling months on tour with bands such as the Clash and the Sex Pistols, Gruen has done it all. He always seemed to be in the right place at the right time, capturing loving and candid shots of both emerging and established artists including the Rolling Stones, the Ramones, Blondie, Led Zeppelin, Patti Smith and New York Dolls.

Decades of constant documenting yielded many famous photographs and subjects, including John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Gruen befriended the couple in their New York years and shot some of the most iconic, enduring photos of Lennon, among them the one of Lennon wearing the sleeveless New York City ringer T-shirt and the photo where he’s flashing the peace sign in front of the Statue of Liberty.

Gruen’s newest book, Rock Seen, serves as a collection of the photographer’s favorite shots from throughout his 40-year career — he also wrote captions and included behind-the-scenes stories to accompany the photographs. We spoke to Gruen in advance of his appearance this week at the St. Louis Jewish Book Festival and asked him about his work habits, past projects and plans for the future.

Chuck Berry by Bob Gruen

Jaime Lees: Part of what I like about your work is that you seem to be a fan first, and I think that it shows in your photos.

Bob Gruen: Yes, well, that’s because I didn’t choose to have a career. I was a child of the ’60s. You know, “Turn on, tune in and drop out”? And I did. I lived with a rock & roll band because I like rock & roll music, and I tend to be friends with musicians and performers and artists. And when they got a record deal the company used my pictures. And then they hired me to take more pictures, and every time I would go and do that I’d meet more people who would hire me to do more photos. And I just kind of fell into this career of rock photography. It wasn’t something I sought out — I really wasn’t planning to have any career. I was pretty aimless as a kid. I really wasn’t expecting much to happen. [Laughs] I couldn’t really do a nine-to-five. Like, my parents were sort of trying to get me into a nine-to-five office career, which didn’t appeal to me at all, especially the nine o’clock part. [Laughs] So that’s why I was living with a rock band, and it just kind of turned out that that’s what I was suited for and that’s what I ended up doing.

In spite of myself I have a strong work ethic. I figured out what it is: It’s because I really don’t like to work. And until I finish something, I feel that I’m working because I live in my studio. And if I came home at night and the film wasn’t developed, I’d have to do it the next day, and I had other things to do the next day. So I’d tend to go out and spend the night hanging out with friends and drinking and carrying on, and then I’d come home, and it’s four or five o’clock in the morning, and I’d develop the film.

How do you decide where you’re going to go shoot if you’re not on assignment?

Oh, if I’m not on assignment, I go to see friends or bands that friends recommend, pretty much. I’m not really looking for the next big thing. I never was. Usually the bands that I like don’t make it. [Laughs]

I still go out all the time, but I don’t work as much as I used to. Photography has changed nowadays; it’s much more accessible, so a lot more people are involved in photography. A lot more groups are doing their own work; a lot of groups are much more restrictive. Record companies got much more corporate, and they want to own the images.

And you have less access now.

Yeah, they control the access a lot more, and it’s not as interesting for me. They came up with a three-song rule, where you’re only allowed to take pictures for the first three songs of a group, and I was never into it in that sense of just being on assignment to take a picture of a guy onstage to show what color shirt he’s wearing. To me, I was always more involved as a fan, as somebody who really likes the music, and I wanted to capture the feeling and the passion of what’s going on. And a lot of times that doesn’t happen in the first three songs. Usually in the last three songs, not the first ones. [Laughs] When all of the lights are on, and all of the effects that the band has brought with them are on, and the band is really putting it all out, and the audience is really pumped up, and you have much more excitement and much more feeling — that’s what I’d rather photograph.

I do tend to think of myself as a photojournalist, but I didn’t visit this lifestyle as a journalist. I live this lifestyle, I’ve always been friends with musicians and artists; I feel very comfortable there. So that many times if I had an assignment to go to Madison Square Garden and shoot a band, I’d do that, but after that on my own, as a person, I’d go down to CBGB or Max’s just to hang out. And, you know, I like staying up late. I like going to clubs and hanging out with people, so that wasn’t really an assignment, it was just something I did in my life.

Yeah, you were just kickin’ it. So what’s your next big project?

Well, in December I have to go do an exhibition that we’re putting on in Buenos Aires, sponsored by the American Embassy down there.

Wow! Does it get any bigger than that? I mean, that’s huge!

I don’t know; it’s pretty big. They’ve done more and more events, but not many people in rock & roll are sponsored by the embassy, that’s for sure! But they’re starting to come around. I mean, rock & roll is not teenage music. When Bob Dylan played at Newport, I got my first photo pass there, so I was down front when he played with a rock & roll band, so a lot of people were very upset about that. But over the years I’ve thought about it, and I think what Bob Dylan was doing was kind of making the statement that rock & roll is the folk music of America.

Now we have people like the New York Times recognizing rock & roll; it’s part of our culture. A lot of the magazines did not cover rock & roll or rock stars. There were music magazines, but Life magazine or the New York Times didn’t really review rock & roll at all. Nowadays, you’ll see a review of the Lollapalooza tour or Bonnaroo. We just had the CMJ festival in New York, and there was a big story in the Times about that. It’s becoming more and more regular, but I’m old enough to recognize that it didn’t happen 20 years ago, 30 years ago. Rock & roll was not a part of mainstream culture.

I just met a CEO of a major corporation the other day, and he was telling me about going out just about every night of the week to some different rock show, and he had this big smile like a teenager. And people who are into rock & roll tend to stay young in feeling. It keeps you excited and alive in a sense.

Well, I was at a rock show until 2:30 a.m. last night, and I can’t say that I feel all that excited or alive today…

[Laughs] Well, the next morning is a little difficult, but it is fun at night. I mean, for me rock & roll is about the freedom to express your feelings…loudly. I think that’s what people really like about it.

LINK: Bonus interview outtakes