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Negative Approach and Dinosaur Jr Members Played a Surprise St. Louis Show Last Night

J Mascis digs gear / photo by Jaime Lees

Negative Approach and Dinosaur Jr Members Played a Surprise St. Louis Show Last Night
By Jaime Lees
Wed, Mar 22, 2017

Negative Approach, Trauma Harness and members of Dinosaur Jr played a show at the Way Out Club last night. It wasn’t technically a “secret” show, but it was unadvertised and promoted primarily via word of mouth. Dinosaur Jr slayed at a sold out concert at Delmar Hall just a few days ago, so as a professional courtesy this performance at the comparatively tiny Way Out Club was to stay fairly underground.

This smaller show was organized by Jeremy Kannapell, who in addition to being a seemingly inexhaustible show booker/promoter, is also the program coordinator for New Music Circle and performs his own music under the name Ghost Ice. Kannapell started putting the word out over the weekend and by the time doors opened at the Way Out Club on Tuesday night, it was clear from the size of the excited crowd waiting outside that word had gotten around.

Dinosaur Jr bassist Lou Barlow opened the night with a quiet, sincere, beautifully delicate solo set — just him sitting on a stool with a tiny guitar. The vibe of the room changed quickly when Dinosaur Jr guitarist J Mascis took the stage with a band made up of Dinosaur Jr’s hugely talented tour crew, and they launched into a set of songs by the Stooges. (It ripped, yo.) This was followed by Negative Approach, who drenched the place with so much energy that it seemed like it might explode. The headliner for the night was local band Trauma Harness, and these future legends fit in seamlessly alongside the established greats. KDHX DJ Jeff Hess provided music between the sets.

Many attendees described this show as even better than they could’ve imagined — saying that they felt honored to witness these unique performances at such a small venue for a mere $10. It was a memorable, magical experience.

We captured this holy night for you in photographs and in video. Please enjoy below.

PHOTOS:

Dancers on stage during the Stooges set / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Lou Barlow from the side of the stage / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Local heroes Trauma Harness / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Where the magic happens / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

The Way Out Club, before the show / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Lou Barlow of Dinosaur Jr soundchecks / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

This crowd was rippling like a river / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

More Lou Barlow / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

The late crowd loved Trauma Harness / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

The impossible-to-photograph Negative Approach / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

The bar was busy / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

The crowd waiting outside, just after the doors opened / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

DJ Jeff Hess spins records between sets / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr with this excellent band / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Lou Barlow of Dinosaur Jr plays a solo set / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

Bob Putnam, owner of the Way Out Club / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

John Brannon of Negative Approach at soundcheck / Photo by Jaime Lees

 

J Mascis feelin ‘it / Photo by Jaime Lees

VIDEOS:

Lou Barlow solo

J Mascis and Dinosaur Jr’s tour crew cover the Stooges





Negative Approach

Trauma Harness

Bonus footage – John Brannon of Negative Approach sings the Stooges’ “TV Eye” with Dinosaur Jr at Delmar Hall on March 19, 2017

link: Riverfront Times

Dinosaur Jr at LouFest, 8/25/12: Review, Photos and Setlist

photo by Jason Stoff

Dinosaur Jr at LouFest, 8/25/12: Review, Photos and Setlist
By Jaime Lees Sun., Aug. 26 2012 at 11:53 AM

The Dinosaur Jr diehards moved in as soon as the Son Volt crowd moved out. Claiming rib-bruising spots against the metal crowd-control fence, they stood patiently — prepared to wait out Phantogram’s electro-beeps blazing in the distance from across the lawn. Their determination paid off an hour or so later when these fans had a front row spot to witness one of the most respected bands of the alternative era take the stage.

Dinosaur Jr regularly plays to tens of thousands at behemoth European festivals, so to see the band at a comparatively tiny outdoor concert like LouFest is a luxury. Weather conditions were questionable and thunderstorms threatened for the better part of the afternoon, but a cool breeze picked up and the rain (an annoying, but not drenching drizzle) stopped just a few minutes into Dino’s set, right after bassist Lou Barlow encouraged the crowd to chant the name of the drummer. (“Murph! Murph! Murph!”) The stagehands looked relieved and everybody stopped eyeing the thin protective plastic wrapped around the band’s massive pedal boards.

Barlow began the show with a smile and mumbled something about how he heard that rain doesn’t mix with electricity. Nearly half of the audience was busy putting in ear plugs during that moment, preparing for the massive sonic blast that was to come. Dinosaur Jr is a notoriously loud band and just because there is no roof over the venue does not mean that the crowd can escape the noise. This show, however, seemed (mercifully) quieter than some past shows, and the deafening, esophagus rattling blasts were only endured by those in the first few rows.

The generous time slot (an hour an a half, at sunset) was used in full and the crowd was showered with nothing but hits. The set began with “Thumb,” ended with “Sludgefeast” and included songs from nearly every Dino album since its self-titled debut in 1985. The band played nearly half of the songs on its 1987 classic album, You’re Living All Over Me, to the great delight of those in attendance.

As far as individual songs, the shifting tempo change in the live version of “Feel the Pain” is always interesting to hear when compared to the album version, the glow of the red stage lights during “Out There” can make one feel slightly hypnotized and “Little Fury Things” seemed to get the biggest reaction and the most enthusiastic clapping from the fans.

The LouFest crowd was also given a rare treat when the band played a cover of Deep Wound’s “Training Ground.” Deep Would was the high school band of guitarist J. Mascis and bassist Lou Barlow and the song sounded predictably punk. A joyous mini-pit broke out in front, with fans running in small circles and hug-slamming each other.

The band members, themselves, were in fine form. Murph’s drumming was on point and he got to show off a little, especially during “Feel the Pain.” J Mascis was appropriately shy and subtly funny, ducking out next to the speakers and then explaining that he had to look up the setlist on his iPhone. (And his silver unicorn hair is always a delight to see.) But the man of the day was Lou Barlow. It was LouFest, he pointed out. He killed during “Forget the Swan” and his bass provided clear and distinct thumping as he beamed and strangled the neck. He seemed to be having a great time and after his show he could even be seen standing on stage and sporting a bemused smile as he looked across the baseball fields and watched the crowd groove to Girl Talk.

Dinosaur Jr at LouFest: Setlist
“Thumb”
“The Lung”
“Back to Your Heart”
“No Bones”
“Budge”
“Training Ground” (Deep Wound cover)
“Tarpit”
“Little Fury Things”
“Out There”
“Feel the Pain”
“The Wagon”
“Freak Scene”
“Just Like Heaven” (Cure cover)
“Forget the Swan”
“Kracked”
“Sludgefeast”

link: Riverfront Times

Interview with Lou Barlow of Dinosaur Jr.

J Mascis, Lou Barlow and Murph of Dinosaur Jr. Photo by Brantley Gutierrez.

J Mascis, Lou Barlow and Murph of Dinosaur Jr. Photo by Brantley Gutierrez.

Dinosaur Jr./Lou Barlow & the MissingMen
By Jaime Lees
Published on October 05, 2009
8 p.m. Wednesday, October 14. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard.
$22 advance, $25 day of show. 314-726-6161.

With grunge-era staples such as “Freak Scene” and “Out There,”Dinosaur Jr. specialized in bittersweet compositions, where even the sad songs were love songs and even the love songs were sad. But they were no crybabies: An impermeable wall of screaming guitar concealed much of this melancholy. To the delight of fans, not much has changed over the past twenty or so years. The older songs still ring true, and the live shows are still a pulverizing avalanche of sound. (The volume of which can only be described as “unholy.”) And don’t call this a nostalgia tour: The band’s new album, Farm, might be its best one yet — supplying a mixture of confessional songwriting and dizzy, throbbing rock. Dino’s own Lou Barlow opens the show in support of his solo album, Goodnight Unknown.

INTERVIEW:

Lou Barlow has indie cred out the ass. As the bass player for Dinosaur Jr (which is playing at the Pageant on Wednesday, October 14), Barlow (alongside guitarist J Mascis and drummer Murph) has been at the forefront of the “alternative” scene since the early ’80s.

And if playing with Dinosaur Jr. wasn’t enough, this dude started college radio gods Sebadoh as a side gig. A side gig! He needed another outlet for his songwriting and — whoops! — he accidentally started freakin’ Sebadoh. Jeez.

Still, it gets crazier. For a few years in the mid-’90s, Barlow fronted psych duo Folk Implosion. Yeah, you know ’em. That’s the band that scored a surprise hit with the spooky “Natural One” off of the soundtrack from the film KIDS.

Oh yeah, and Mr. Midas puts out beautiful lo-fi solo albums, the latest of which, Goodnight Unknown, is released this week on Merge.

We “interviewed” Barlow via email a couple of weeks ago while he was touring with Dinosaur Jr. in Europe. He was gracious enough to write us back, despite the semi-ridiculous questions we sent his way. Thanks, Lou.

Jaime Lees: So you’re doing a weird thing on this tour. In addition to playing with Dinosaur Jr., you’re also the opening act, playing your solo music with a backing band. How does that work out? It seems exhausting. Do you need to take a nappy, Lou Barlow?
naw, the more i play the more energy i have. dino only plays for an hour and half a night. my band will be playing for 45 minutes, tops. we’ll be on a bus, so i can sleep, dino has roadies so i can sit on my ass for most of a day. i’ll be fine.

Your new album, Goodnight Unknown, gets better with each listen. It seems more upbeat than your previous solo work, but it still lovey and conflicted. Do you write about situations in your own life or do you see yourself more as a storyteller?
i’m not a storyteller. at all. the songs are based on situations in my life. i collect phrases that have the right feel when i sing them. string them together around the theme. maybe a particular incident or a general message ( i.e. ‘i love you’ ). songs provide a lot to hide behind. you can get away with murdering the language. as long as the feel is right.

When you’re writing music, how do you decide who gets it? Meaning: Do you write songs for your solo albums and Dinosaur Jr. albums separately? Or does it all start from the same place?
with dino i like to start with improvising bass and drums. finding riffs that feel good. then marrying them with existing melodies or something totally new. the main objective is matching the texture of j’s songs in some way. i don’t want to frankenstein a song i wrote on acoustic into a dino-replica. i want it to be organically dino. if that makes sense. the songs i write on acoustic guitars seem best kept acoustic, for now. those became the songs on ‘goodnight unknown’

So, I really loved those silver and purple limited edition Dinosaur Jr. themed Nike High-Top Dunks. Do you have any other plans to license merchandise like this? And can you hook a ho up with some phat new kicks? (Ladies size 7, please)
i don’t even know how that happened. j’s on a whole other level of brand awareness and profit avenues.

Do you still live in L.A.? What’s the process for when Dinosaur Jr. needs to get together to write, rehearse or record?
i still live in LA. when dino needs me i go back east, stay with my parents and soak up the hometown vibes. and i can bring my wife and the kid out for gramma time.

How on earth do you still have your hearing? I last saw Dinosaur Jr. play in 2006 and it was the loudest MF sound I’ve ever heard in my life. Not just the loudest concert I’ve ever been to, but the loudest sound I’ve ever heard. Many people fled the venue. Those who stayed were shoving cocktail napkins down their ear canals. At least two chicks were crying. Does that make you proud, Lou? Huh? Does it?
no. it’s f-in ridiculous. it’s j’s trip. he is inflexibly dedicated to the idea of extreme volume as a necessity. was then, is now. it’s one of the great mascis mysteries.

i wear 2 pairs of 33 db reduction earplugs. one pair buried in my ear canals, the other gaffer taped on top of those.. it sounds and feels pretty great that way. i experience the songs on a physical level as well as melodic and emotional (i think and dance to them )

we played a show last year with small amps and it was great. we really don’t need the extreme amplification but it’s part of j’s ‘brand’. that’s the ship i’m sailing on and i won’t be mutinying anytime soon. the positives still outweigh the negs.